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AMERICAN JOURNALISM REVIEW: The Lonely Life of a Third-Party Presidential Candidate

With a few exceptions, it’s tough to get attention from the mainstream media. Mon., November 5, 2012.

By Elia Powers 
Elia Powers (epowers81@gmail.com) is a doctoral student at the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland. He has previously written for the Los Angeles Times, Inside Higher Ed and the St. Louis Beacon.

Forty-eight hours before the first polls close on Election Day 2012, four longshot presidential candidates held one of the final debates of the political season less than two miles from the White House.

Little about this debate resembled the three showdowns between President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney in October. The setting was a cramped back room of a restaurant-bookstore, not a cavernous college campus arena. Candidates debated beneath portraits of the Dalai Lama, Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr., not the Declaration of Independence and a giant eagle. The host was a prominent former third-party candidate, not a broadcast journalist. The debate covered global warming, the minimum wage and Washington, D.C., voting rights, issues that weren't touched in the major-party candidates' debates. Candidates were able to ask each other pointed questions, which was expressly prohibited in the Obama-Romney debates.

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THE WELL VERSED: Green Party Presidential Candidate Jill Stein Talks Doing Away With "Politics Of Fear"

If you believe tomorrow’s election is all about Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, Jill Stein wants you to know there are alternatives. On more than 80 percent of ballots across the countries, voters have an opportunity to cast a vote for Stein, who’s running as the Green Party presidential candidate. In a sit down with The Well Versed, Stein tells us why voting for the lesser of two evils is still an endorsement for evil, how she’d work with Democrats and Republicans and president and how to continue building a Green movement after November 6, 2012.

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THE HARVARD CRIMSON: Who is Jill Stein?

I almost titled this column “Why I Refuse to Vote for Obama.” But the progressive case against Obama has been persuasively made again and again and there’s not really much I could add. So, instead, I’ve chosen to focus on the Green Party presidential candidate in this election, in hopes of informing fellow well-intentioned liberals and progressives in the Harvard community about her candidacy. So, who is Dr. Jill Stein ’73 and why are you likely not to know a thing about her?

Jill Stein, an alumna of Harvard College (1973) and Harvard Medical School (1979), is a physician specializing in internal medicine. She was a candidate for Governor of Massachusetts in the 2002 and 2010 gubernatorial elections here. Unfortunately, she and her platform have been rendered virtually invisible in this election! This is primarily due to harsh ballot access laws and a corrupt debate system, both of which work to hide third-party candidates from the public eye.

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NEW YORK TIMES: Another Presidential Debate, but This Time the Candidates Are Much Less Familiar

WASHINGTON — The presidential candidates held another animated debate on Sunday night, one dedicated to covering the many contentious political issues that the previous debates had failed to address.

But it was not Mitt Romney and President Obama sparring over the legality of drone strikes or the best way to end poverty in America. The event was not held in a well-lighted theater, or broadcast to millions at home.

Instead it was four third-party candidates striving to win attention and sway votes in the waning hours of the presidential campaign from a crowded room in the back of a Bohemian coffee shop.

The candidates — Gary Johnson of the Libertarian Party, Jill Stein of the Green Party, Rocky Anderson of the Justice Party and Virgil Goode of the Constitution Party — sparred at an event moderated by the most famous third-party candidate in recent memory, Ralph Nader.

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INDEX: INDEX Q&A: It’s not easy being Green for US third party candidate

Nov 5, 2012 (Index) The United States two-party system leaves little room for third party candidates in the presidential race. Green Party nominee Jill Stein has faced numerous obstacles throughout her run — including being arrested outside of one of the presidential debate between President Obama and Mitt Romney.

Index’s Sara Yasin spoke to the candidate about free speech in America, and the challenges she’s faced as a third party candidate in the Presidential race

Index: What are the biggest barriers faced by alternative candidates in the Presidential race?

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VALLEY ADVOCATE: Practicing Political Medicine

On the afternoon of October 16, while Barack Obama and Mitt Romney were preparing for their debate at Hofstra University, Jill Stein was being handcuffed by police outside the auditorium.

She would have preferred to be inside the hall that day, debating alongside her fellow candidates for president of the United States. But Stein, the Green Party’s candidate, was excluded from the event, as she had been from the first presidential debate a couple of weeks earlier (so, too, were other third-party candidates, including Gary Johnson, the former New Mexico governor who’s the Libertarian Party nominee).

 

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HUFFINGTON POST: The Green Elephant in the Room

As the New Jersey Shore's "surreality" show continues to unfold on TV, one cannot help but note all the ads on CNN and Fox News from those that likely helped make such epic storms possible, or -- at the very least -- helped to make them worse. Commercials from the oil and coal industry pepper the coverage like so many reminders of what is notbeing discussed by the mainstream news media: the role our dependence on fossil fuels is playing in this unfolding mega disaster.

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THE UPTAKE: Green Party’s First Act in White House would be Foreclosure Moratorium

Green Party vice presidential candidate Cheri Honkala said that, were she and presidential candidate Jill Stein to win Tuesday’s election, the first thing they’d do would be to “turn the White House into the ‘green house’ and enact a moratorium on foreclosures in the United States of America.” The Green Party is on the ballot in 36 states and the District of Columbia, and can appear as write-ins in seven more states.

“The Democrats and Republicans are never gonna talk about home foreclosures,” Honkala told an Occupy Homes rally in South Minneapolis late last month. “They’ve participated in bailing out the banks across this country, and quite frankly they don’t give a damn about poor and working people. Already eight million families have lost their homes to foreclosure. How many more families have to lose their homes, and how many more have to be broken up and destroyed? There’s no words to the damage they’re doing to young people.”

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TRUTH DIG RADIO: Jill Stein and Rocky Anderson Have Their Say

This week on Truthdig Radio in association with KPFK: There’s an election Tuesday, and we invite the two main alternative candidates to make a case for why we should take a chance on them in an election that is already too close to call. Also: Mo Rocca and Robert Scheer.

This radio program originally appeared on Truthdig Radio.The interview with Dr. Stein runs first.

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THE TENNESSEAN: Presidential candidate Jill Stein brings Green Party message

Promising to turn the White House “into a greenhouse,” Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein brought a passionate message to a Nashville audience Thursday, urging listeners not to “waste” their votes on the major-party nominees.

Stein, who was arrested on a trespassing charge Wednesday while protesting construction of the Keystone XL pipeline in Texas, said neither President Barack Obama nor Republican candidate Mitt Romney would do what’s necessary to halt climate change, repair the economy or solve other pressing national problems.

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